5 Comments

  1. amanda

    love this Joe! so true.
    forwarding your blog to Ivan. he didn’t know you had a blog + is looking forward to reading your words!

  2. MikeSpartan300

    Yes, either most of us or all of us start with a conclusion on things, then ignore the facts and experiences that don’t fit. However, let me timidly proffer the idea that starting with a conclusion isn’t a mistake, the mistake is only the second part, ignoring or rejecting the facts and experiences that don’t fit. I’m going to jump out on an analogy that might crash, but when a baby is born, it can learn any language in the world, a biologically Chinese baby can learn Swahili , An aboriginal baby could learn Russian. In my mind, the language is the conclusion, a baby grows up in Cajun country and the “conclusion” is they will call things and pronounce things the Cajun way. Thus, I, for example call a friend a friend, and the French word “Ami” is wrong for me , or the Swahili word “Raffiki” is unrecognizable and thus wrong. Of course some can learn two or more languages and that is great, but the way I see it, if a baby, or anyone was going to go purely by “the facts” they would have to learn two hundred or more words for one thing. It would take forever to learn to speak. Thus we start with a conclusion, this kid is going to learn Bulgarian, or this kid is in an environment where she will learn Italian, Arabic, and Spanish, then along the way, in life, said individuals make pick up more words from other languages or they may reject them. It is usually the parents that control what language a child ends up speaking and what religion/belief system they learn. To reject your belief system because you can’t fit a fact into it, would be like rejecting your mother tongue because you encounter a foreign word, that doesn’t fit your language.

    • Bookscrounger

      I think you’ve hit on the problem; we can’t be sure, but we we still have to choose. That is inherent to who and where we are. I would make this counter-offer however, if the child encounters something important that the language doesn’t contain or describe, then it requires some reflection, discussion, and perhaps a decision to bring in another language, or even a neologism.

      I do it all the time… 😉

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